Skip Navigation

Species Search:

The latest in news, stories and just plain fun from the world of

Recent Entries

Monthly Archives

Why Do Crows Gather In Large Roosts During Fall and Winter?
Posted on Thursday, October 13, 2016 by eNature
American Crow vocalizing
American Crow vocalizing
Range of American Crow
Range of American Crow

Steve Bailey is a bit of an exception.

Whereas most people in Danville, Illinois, wish the crows now in their midst would find themselves another winter home, he welcomes the visitors with open arms. He’s a bird lover, of course, and proud to live in the unofficial Winter Crow Capital of North America—despite the noise, the mess, and the smell that comes with that distinction.

Danville is home to roughly 35,000 people. Its crows, however,  number some 162,000 according to the recent Audubon Christmas Bird Count. There are so many crows in the 6- to 8-block area where they nightly roost that their weight sometimes snaps branches off trees.

And then there’s the endless supply of droppings and the incessant racket. No wonder some desperate residents have cut down healthy shade trees in order to force the birds to relocate. Others have tried scaring the birds away with plastic owls and sirens, even recordings of Barred Owl calls played throughout the night.

Still, the birds remain. The most obvious reason for their stubbornness is that Danville offers a perfect location for crows. It’s in a river valley surrounded by agricultural land in all directions. As for the crows’ communal tendencies, the birds know that there is strength in numbers. That is, roosting together helps them watch for predators and increases their chances of finding food.

Given these tendencies, it should come as no surprise that Danville’s is not the only large crow roost that takes shape in the United States from fall to spring. In Jasper County, Iowa, for example, thousands of crows settle down a little to the east of Newton. In Massachusetts, up to 20,000 descend on the center of Framingham every afternoon. Wichita, Kansas, has 100,000 crows spread among a few roosts. And in the 1940s and ‘50s, Stafford County, Kansas, hosted upwards of a million crows in winter, though that roost eventually disintegrated.

And perhaps the same fate will someday befall Danville’s crows. No doubt most of the town’s residents would welcome such a development. For bird lovers like Steve Bailey, though, Danville just wouldn’t be the same without its winter crows.

Good or bad, they’re certainly a spectacle!

Have you encountered a large roost of crows?  There’s one not far from our eNature office— and you’ll often hear it before you see the birds.  It’s always a fun visit.

Let us know what you’re seeing out there!

Recent story from Danville's local paper about the Xmas Bird Count of crows »

How to tell a crow from raven »

(2) CommentsPermalink



Posted by Stacy on 10/18

difference between cialis & cialis
generic cialis  cialis from canada no prescription last post
generic cialis - cialis and alcohol side effects joined
prostate and cialis

Posted by Jimzypep on 10/22

A Couple Of Comments About Leaving Comments: Only your name will appear with your comment and, since we now moderate comments to stop spammers, your comment will appear once it's approved by the blog moderator.

Name (required):

Email (required):

Please enter the word you see below:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments

By submitting content, I acknowledge I have read and agree to eNature’s Terms of Use

eNature Web Site Terms of Use
1. Messages and other content posted on the eNature web site express the views of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of eNature. Discussions on the eNature web site about other organizations, events, or resources and links to other organizations’ web sites do not constitute an endorsement by eNature.

2. By using the eNature web site, you agree not to post any message or other content that is obscene, vulgar, slanderous, threatening, or that violates any laws. Personal attacks, hateful, and racially or ethnically derogatory comments will not be tolerated.

3. You agree not to post, reproduce, distribute or exploit any information on the eNature web site for advertising or commercial purposes.

4. Content on the eNature web site may include intellectual property that is protected under copyright, trademark and other intellectual property laws. Such laws generally prohibit the unauthorized reproduction, distribution or exhibition of protected materials. By posting messages or other content, you represent and warrant that (a) you have the legal right to reproduce and distribute such content and (b) eNature may reproduce, adapt, perform, display, and distribute such content in any form, worldwide and in perpetuity. eNature reserves the right to delete, move or edit any messages or other content for any reason, in eNature’s sole discretion.

5. eNature does not warrant that any information on the eNature web site is complete or accurate, and will not be liable any direct, indirect, incidental, punitive or consequential damages that may result from the use or inability to use the eNature web site, including the use of or reliance on any information made available on the web site.

6. The eNature reserves the right to prohibit access by any user who violates these Terms of Use, and to make changes to these Terms of Use at any time in its sole discretion.

Advanced Search
Subscribe to newsletters



© 2008